Tag Archives: HIV Research

Oral Care & Viral Reservoirs

Oral Report
Could something as simple as oral care affect viral reservoirs?

Research performed at Case Western found increased levels of HIV in the saliva and blood of people who had severe periodontitis (inflammation of the gums around the teeth). They discovered byproducts of bacteria, called metabolic small chain fatty acid (SCFA), that are associated with periodontitis, which can work together to awaken dormant HIV and cause it to reactivate, leading to an increase in residual HIV.

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Taking stock of current HIV vaccine efforts

The HIV vaccine field is just now beginning to recover from the disappointments of prior large-scale vaccine studies and is beginning to show momentum, but where is that momentum headed? While much has been learned from those prior studies and vaccinology in general, one could well argue that HIV vaccine efforts are not as robust as they could be, likewise they do not take into consideration the overall picture of the requirements for an HIV vaccine. In particular, AIDS is a pandemic requiring cost-effective treatment. Even a partially active vaccine would have great benefit if they were cost-effective, easy to use and safe.

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4 CROI Briefs

Another year of the Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI 2016) has come to pass. Here are a few less publicized but important highlights on HIV remission and eradication from this year’s conference.

A Second Berlin Patient?
Several attempts have been made in HIV-positive cancer patients to reproduce the possible eradication of HIV seen in Timothy Ray Brown. There have been past reports of procedures that appeared promising, but eventually viral rebound occurred or the patient succumbed to cancer.

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NIH scientists find mechanism that helps HIV evade antibodies, stabilize key proteins

HIV News LogoDiscovery may have implications for HIV vaccine research

WHAT:

NIH scientists have discovered a mechanism involved in stabilizing key HIV proteins and thereby concealing sites where some of the most powerful HIV neutralizing antibodies bind, findings with potential implications for HIV vaccine research.
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